BONIFACIO (WULSTY CASTLE) - 1918

BONIFACIO (WULSTY CASTLE) - 1918

Postby northeast » Tue Sep 18, 2012 9:15 am

WULSTYCASTLE1918asBONIFACIO Blumer.jpg

1918, 3566grt
Blumer (248) as WULSTY CASTLE for Lancashire Shipping, Liverpool
1936 CRAGGAN HILL, Liverpool
1937 BONIFACIO, Cie France-Navigation, Dieppe
2942 CAMPO BASSO, Italian Government
Sunk 04/05/1943 off Kelibia by gunfire from British destroyers.
northeast
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Re: BONIFACIO (WULSTY CASTLE) - 1918

Postby E28 » Mon May 01, 2023 8:08 pm

Electric propulsion on the steamship Wulsty Castle.

I intended to attach an article written by George Pulham, probably better qualified to explain the detail of the Wulsty Castle's electric propulsion than anyone as her chief engineer but this has not happened.

Wulsty Castle was Britain's first such vessel, the irony being she was a pretty standard steamship.
Thats all folks. Sean.
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Re: BONIFACIO (WULSTY CASTLE) - 1918

Postby northeast » Tue May 02, 2023 6:04 pm

Indeed, turbo-electric but it lasted only until 1926, then converted to motor-ship, and in 1936 to a bog-standard triple expansion!
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Re: BONIFACIO (WULSTY CASTLE) - 1918

Postby Hornbeam » Wed May 03, 2023 8:31 am

Interesting Engineroom history to say the least although reading up on old Enginerooms it is understandable why the changes were made.
Turbo Electrics were mainly an American thang, expensive to install and at that time the Steam Turbines were unreliable due to blade failure because of poor materials.
The attraction of the Diesel Engineroom was that barring for an Auxiliary Boiler there was no requirement for a Stokehold/Boileroom and all the gubbins that it requires giving extra cargo space unless it was a Scott Still Engine? which used both sources of power, unfortunately it was a bit of a failure.
So back to the ever faithful Triple Expansion Engine which once “set away” just ran and ran as long as the Steam and Lubrication were available, it would have to be a major failure not to keep a Triple Expansion going.
Triple Expansions were still being built in the 1950’s my first tripper was on a Sunderland built Cargo Ship, Triple+ LP Turbine built in the 1950’s
Triple Expansions rule ok :D Engineering at its best. With a Nuclear Steam Plant?
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